CUNY MA/PhD Program in Linguistics, in collaboration with the CUNY Phonology Forum, cosponsored the CUNY Conference on the Segment January 11—13, 2012.

Topics revolved around the status of the segment in Phonology. Some of the issues addressed in the conference include the following:

  • Do segments exist?
  • Are segments derived or are they underlying?
  • Is the principle of segmentation in phonology an instance of a broader phenomenon?
  • What is the internal structure of the segment?
  • Are segments hierarchically dominated by prosodic categories in lexical representation? Or at any other level of phonetics or phonology?
  • What principles guide the sequencing of segments?
  • What aspects of segments or their sequencing are referred to by morphological and phonological rules/constraints?
  • How do phonetic segments relate to phonological segments (and vice versa)?
  • What role is played by segments in human cognition?
  • Are phonological segmentms uniquely human?
  • What is the neural representation of segments?

Invited Speakers

Carol Fowler, University of Connecticut and Haskins Laboratories
Segments in Articulatory Phonology 

William Idsardi, University of Maryland
The neural representation of segments and features 

William Marslen-Wilson, University of Cambridge
Phonological processing and representation in a neurocognitive context 

 

2012 Conference on the Segment Program(in PDF format).

Open Disscussion of  Motivations for Proposing the Syllable in Phonology

Why did phonologists propose the notion of the syllable as a theoretical entity? The participants in the Friday Discussion agreed that we would have an open discussion of the ?Reasons for the Syllable.? We have established a Wiki for that purpose. This Wiki can be read by anyone. Invitations will be made freely available to anyone. Please send an email to syllable at cunyphonologyforum dot net and include the words “wiki invite” in the subject line; an invitation will be sent as soon as one of the organizers logs on next.

 

Acknowledgments

This conference, as well as the preceding ones, would not have been possible without the effective and enthusiastic assistance provided by students in the CUNY Graduate Center’s Graduate Program in Linguistics. We thank these volunteers: Ylana Beller, Eric Chambers, Kate Dawson, Wendy Dorsett, Laurie Gluck, Stephanie Kakadelis, Emily Long, Christen Madsen (Student Wrangler par excellence), Ignacio Montoya, Tsion Yi, and Namseok Yong.

The unfailingly professional and efficient support provided by the CUNY Graduate Center’s Facilities and Security departments has also been invaluable. Chuck Cairns (CUNY) and Eric Raimy (University of Wisconsin) are primarily responsible for managing this website and organizing the public events. The CUNY collaborators are Professors Juliette Blevins, Dianne Bradley, Ann Delilkan, Kathleen Currie Hall, and Robert Vago.